I wonder how many of these are on Netflix? I think I've only see maybe a quarter of these.
Otter Source
Posted by potatono in the wired 1 day ago
The source code to Otter, the software that runs linkfilter.
The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours...

On the strength of that promise, OxyContin became America’s bestselling painkiller, and Purdue reaped $31 billion in revenue.

But OxyContin’s stunning success masked a fundamental problem: The drug wears off hours early in many people...OxyContin is a chemical cousin of heroin, and when it doesn’t last, patients can experience excruciating symptoms of withdrawal, including an intense craving for the drug.

The problem offers new insight into why so many people have become addicted to OxyContin, one of the most abused pharmaceuticals in U.S. history...

The [Los Angeles] Times investigation, based on thousands of pages of confidential Purdue documents and other records, found that:

-- Purdue has known about the problem for decades...

-- The company has held fast to the claim of 12-hour relief, in part to protect its revenue...


First part of an investigative series.

[vices, the biz]
Although Duo is available on both iOS and Android, Google's goal is clearly to give Android users a FaceTime-like experience...Google had three priorities when it crafted what it sees as the perfect app for one-to-one videoconferencing: simplicity, speed and "human" features.

The simplicity is apparent as soon as you launch the app. Similar to Snapchat, you're greeted with a view from your phone's camera, although on Duo it's your selfie cam...there's a row of yellow circles that show your most recent calls. In the bottom left is the big, blue call button; tapping it brings up a list of your phone's contacts.

...Duo uses your phone's contact list — not your Gmail contacts. And when you first set up the app, you do so with your phone number and not your Google account...
Radiocarbon dating reveals the Greenland shark reaches sexual maturity at 150 years of age, and has a lifespan of at least 400 years, making it the longest-lived vertebrate on Earth, according to a study published in the journal Science.

In fact, most attendees needed little introduction to Gopher — the software had been out for months. It was the developers they were curious about, the Minnesotans who had created the first popular means of accessing the internet. “People we’d never met were telling us how they were using our stuff and adding things to it,” McCahill says. “We had no idea how big Gopher was going to be until we experienced this firsthand and realized that growth could be exponential for a while.”


In the years that followed, the future seemed obvious. The number of Gopher users expanded at orders of magnitude more than the World Wide Web. Gopher developers held gatherings around the country, called GopherCons, and issued a Gopher T-shirt — worn by MTV veejay Adam Curry when he announced the network’s Gopher site. The White House revealed its Gopher site on Good Morning America. In the race to rule the internet, one observer noted, “Gopher seems to have won out.”
A recent analysis of 60 years of data reveals that cephalopod populations, including squid, octopuses, and cuttlefish, have increased globally since the 1950s.
...the Most Controversial Race at the Olympics

The women’s 800-meter competition will be one of the most eagerly anticipated events at the Rio Olympics, and not just because the racers are fast. Some are also biologically different, at least to some degree. In earlier Olympics, they might have been disqualified, or even accused of being men. That won't happen in Rio. But the whole world will be looking very closely at South Africa's Caster Semenya (on LF) and her closest competitors.
I'm going to cut the preamble here and get straight to the chase: what the hell is going on in this GIF? How did it all happen? Did a troupe of butterflies flap their wings really hard on the other side of the planet, and through the Super Chaos Theory cause this everyman's Cirque du Soleil? I don't even know where this comes from...or who filmed it, but I want to know what is going on. I need to know. Let's Zapruder this GIF.
The members of [the 'Skullcap Crew'] ... have together faced at least 128 known official allegations from more than 60 citizen-filed complaints over almost a decade and a half. They have also been named in more than 20 federal lawsuits.

Citizens have repeatedly accused these men of acts of brutality, intimidation and harassment – costing the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal settlements. Yet over the course of their careers, these officers have received little discipline – a two-day suspension, a five-day suspension, a reprimand – according to city data. Instead, they have won praise from the department, accruing more than 180 commendations.

[government, vices]
Quote: So we like silence for what it doesn’t do—it doesn’t wake, annoy, or kill us—but what does it do? When Florence Nightingale attacked noise as a “cruel absence of care,” she also insisted on the converse: Quiet is a part of care, as essential for patients as medication or sanitation. It’s a strange notion, but one that researchers have begun to bear out as true.
Art Ritchie and Dan Jones have cornered the market on wooden carousels. As the founders of Carousel Works in Mansfield, Ohio, their marvelous creations have found homes all around the world. But these days, wooden carousels are becoming increasingly rare, and Ritchie and Jones, who have been partners for three decades, are some of the last craftsmen who make a living designing them.
Kidlington is a large village in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of a little less than 14,000, according to the last census. If you've never heard of it, you're not alone. Kidlington is a fairly average English village and not an exceptionally remarkable place.
Despite a lack of obvious tourist attractions, Kidlington locals have recently been surprised to see busloads of foreign tourists arriving on their streets and taking photographs.
I used Jane & Michael's 1983 book "Goodfood" as my guide for places to eat on my adventure road trip across the USA in the early 1980's. Good to see that they've gone modern with a website.
James Newman started work on the "Megaprocessor", which is 33ft (10m) wide and 6ft (2m) high, in 2012.
It does the job of a chip-sized microprocessor and Mr Newman has spent £40,000 ($53,000) creating it.
It contains 40,000 transistors, 10,000 LED lights and it weighs around half a tonne (500kg). So far, he has used it to play the classic video game Tetris.