One need only peruse through some of the approximately 1,000 cases upon which the Justice Department has acted since the Voting Rights Act was last renewed in 1982 to find plenty that has kept the department's attorneys busy.  
 
In 2001, for example, the all-white board of aldermen in Kilmichael, Miss., canceled the town's local elections three weeks before Election Day, as it was becoming apparent the town's first black mayor and council members might be elected. The aldermen, elected at large, wanted the delay so they could re-map the town into districts, which would have protected seats held by whites. The Justice Department rejected the change.  
 
more on the kilmichael, miss. incident
re: Hamden vs. Rumsfeld:  
 
Justice Thomas refers to Justice Stevens ’ “unfamiliarity with the realities of warfare”; but Stevens served in the U.S. Navy from 1942 to 1945, during World War II. Thomas’s official bio, by contrast, contains no experience of military service.
 
military experience is definitely not necessary for good governing. but, it is unacceptble for the bushies, who falsly accuse dems not supporting the troops, to continually attack those who have served, like john kerry, max cleland, justice stevens, in regards to their service.  
For five years, President Bush waged war as he saw fit. If intelligence officers needed to eavesdrop on overseas telephone calls without warrants, he authorized it. If the military wanted to hold terrorism suspects without trial, he let it.  
 
Now the Supreme Court has struck at the core of his presidency and dismissed the notion that the president alone can determine how to defend the country. In rejecting Bush's military tribunals for terrorism suspects, the high court ruled that even a wartime commander in chief must govern within constitutional confines significantly tighter than this president has believed appropriate.
A city man is charged with violating state wiretap laws by recording a detective on his home security camera, while the detective was investigating the man’s sons.  
 
Michael Gannon, 49, of 26 Morgan St., was arrested Tuesday night, after he brought a video to the police station to try to file a complaint against Detective Andrew Karlis, according to Gannon’s wife, Janet Gannon, and police reports filed in Nashua District Court.  
 
Police instead arrested Gannon, charging him with two felony counts of violating state eavesdropping and wiretap law by using an electronic device to record Karlis without the detective’s consent.  
The truth is that despite all their fulminating about judicial activism, conservatives today firmly believe that courts must step in to oversee, correct, or invalidate the actions of government officials. They simply disagree with liberals on when to do it.  
 
That is the real debate—the debate over "when"—we should be having. Not the tiresome mudslinging about who's an "activist" and who's "restrained," but rather an open, honest discussion about when the exercise of judicial power is justified and when it isn't.  
 
The pretense that conservatives favor shrunken courts while liberals favor aggrandized ones obviously plays to a sizable chunk of the Republican base, which in fact wants courts to exit the arena on the issues it cares about most deeply—abortion, gays, and religion in the public square. But the pretense also provides a useful cover for many legal views that just aren't that popular. After all, as compared to the liberal vision of judicial power, the conservative vision typically advantages corporations, developers, state governmental institutions, and monied political interests. Not exactly a winning message.  
 
When they get past the rhetoric, conservatives contend that these outcomes, which usually privilege the rich and powerful, rest on solid legal foundations. Fair enough. The public would benefit from a debate about the merits of such arguments. What the public doesn't benefit from is the charade that these outcomes are compelled by some unwavering commitment to a "limited" role for the courts.
Declaring that "loose lips" kill Americans, a congressional Republican leader said on Wednesday the House of Representatives would debate a resolution condemning the U.S. media for exposing details of secret intelligence programs.  
 
"Loose lips kill American people."
 
free speech is unamerican!
The attempt to Swift-Boat Pennsylvania Congressman and honored Vietnam Vet Jack Murtha has not only failed… but the boat was swamped and the malefactors washed overboard.  
 
A Florida newspaper admits it misquoted Murtha’s comments, which had allegedy included "his" belief that the U-S was the greatest threat to international peace.  
 
The newspaper has now admitted its reporter — or somebody — screwed up and screwed up badly. Murtha was merely quoting an international poll that said many people in many other countries felt that way.  
 
video clip included  
A political consultant whose company was behind a television ad accusing the Clinton-Gore administration of giving away nuclear technology was convicted of child molestation charges.
he full text of each signing statement is provided below. The annotations following each signing statement:  
 
(1) provide links to the text of the laws that are the subject of the signing statement, both in plain text format at the GPO's website for Public and Private Laws, and in PDF format in files taken from the GPO's website;  
 
(2) provide citations to the public law numbers and to the United States Statutes at Large (session laws) for each law that is the subject of a signing statement; and  
 
(3) provide searchable short text excerpted from the Congressional enactment that is the subject of each signing statement.
Stealth Conservatism
Posted by glitch p-udding in government 11 years ago
Conservatives disillusioned with Republican unwillingness to cut government spending can at least take heart that the largesse is not being spent on enforcing laws that regulate the private sector. The latest bit of welcome news for the Right along those lines is Rep. Henry Waxman’s new report finding that warning letters issued by the FDA to drug companies, medical device makers and others dropped 54 percent from 2000 to 2005. Waxman’s study also found an especially steep 65 percent decline in enforcement action against medical device makers, despite widely publicized problems with devices like implantable defibrillators and pacemakers.  
 
The story at the FDA is much the same at other agencies responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment. A number of earlier investigations found similar passive aggression at the EPA, for example.
The minimum wage is $5.15 an hour. Democrats want to raise it to $7.25. During the past nine years, as Democrats have tried unsuccessfully to increase the minimum wage, members of Congress have voted to give themselves pay raises -- technically "cost of living increases" -- totaling $31,600, or more than $15 an hour for a 40-hour week, 52 weeks a year, according to the Congressional Research Service.  
 
Sen. John McCain thought he had a deal when President Bush, faced with a veto-proof margin in Congress, agreed to sign a bill banning the torture of detainees. Not quite. While Bush signed the new law, he also quietly approved another document: a signing statement reserving his right to ignore the law. McCain was furious, and so were other lawmakers.  
 
The Senate Judiciary Committee is opening hearings this week into what has become the White House's favorite tool for overriding Congress in the name of wartime national security.
Senate Democrats reacted angrily yesterday to a report that the U.S. commander in Iraq had privately presented a plan for significant troop reductions in the same week they came under attack by Republicans for trying to set a timetable for withdrawal.  
 
Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) said that the plan attributed to Gen. George W. Casey resembles the thinking of many Democrats who voted for a nonbinding resolution to begin a troop drawdown in December. That resolution was defeated Thursday on a largely party-line vote in the Senate.  
 
"That means the only people who have fought us and fought us against the timetable, the only ones still saying there shouldn't be a timetable really are the Republicans in the United States Senate and in the Congress," Boxer said on CBS's "Face the Nation." "Now it turns out we're in sync with General Casey."
Sabers rattled fiercely in their scabbards but were not drawn Sunday during a bloodless political debate between two old farmers - longtime Republican Sen. Conrad Burns and Democratic challenger Jon Tester.  
 
The men debated for the first time at a conference of the Montana Broadcasters Association in Whitefish.  
 
If Sunday's debate proved anything, it might be that Burns represents a status quo, with a focus on immediate fixes to immediate problems. Tester, on the other hand, emerged as a source of newly creative energy, focusing on long-term solutions consistent with a big-picture vision.  
 
blow by blow at daily kos
In Boca Raton, where gossip is an art form, tongues have been wagging overtime about Monday's bust of a downtown brothel.  
 
Among the alleged johns are a community stalwart, a disgraced entrepreneur and a family values-supporting Republican operative who received the National Republican Congressional Committee's leadership award.