The commentary that shook the blogosphere.
Posted by Bud Tugly 11 years ago
I read a lot of commentary everyday: ten to fifteen newspaper editorials, about twenty columnists, dozens of blog posts from all over the political spectrum, and a lot of talk radio from Limbaugh and Hugh Hewitt on the right, to NPR in the middle, to Randi Rhodes and Mike Malloy on the left. All everyday.  
 
It isn't often when a piece shakes me so with its concision and intelligence. In fact, it shook a lot of us in the blogosphere.  
 
By Victor Davis Hanson:  
 
When I used to read about the 1930s — the Italian invasion of Abyssinia, the rise of fascism in Italy, Spain, and Germany, the appeasement in France and Britain, the murderous duplicity of the Soviet Union, and the racist Japanese murdering in China — I never could quite figure out why, during those bleak years, Western Europeans and those in the United States did not speak out and condemn the growing madness, if only to defend the millennia-long promise of Western liberalism.  
 
Of course, the trauma of the Great War was all too fresh, and the utopian hopes for the League of Nations were not yet dashed. The Great Depression made the thought of rearmament seem absurd. The connivances of Stalin with Hitler — both satanic, yet sometimes in alliance, sometimes not — could confuse political judgments.  
 
But nevertheless it is still surreal to reread the fantasies of Chamberlain, Daladier, and Pope Pius, or the stump speeches by Charles Lindbergh (“Their [the Jews’] greatest danger to this country lies in their large ownership and influence in our motion pictures, our press, our radio, and our government”) or Father Coughlin (“Many people are beginning to wonder whom they should fear most — the Roosevelt-Churchill combination or the Hitler-Mussolini combination.”) — and it is even more baffling to consider that such men ever had any influence.  
 
Not any longer...  
 
 
Read the full piece here.  
 
Victor Davis Hanson is a Democrat.