Bad Girl Scout Cookies
Posted by LinusMines 1 year ago

(via)
Bastards
Posted by LinusMines 6 years ago
(taken during a side-trip to Florida a few weeks ago)  
 
Today's lunch
Posted by LinusMines 6 years ago
This photo doesn't do it justice.  
 
 
 
CapMac
7 years ago...
Posted by LinusMines 6 years ago
Pinkest of the Pink Canned Meats
Posted by LinusMines 6 years ago
DEAR SIR  
 
 
SIR I AM DENNIS SANKO .I AM IN THE REFUGEE CAMP HERE IN GHANA ( WEST - AFRICA ), SIR BEFORE  
 
THE DEATH OF MY FATHER BEFORE MY LATE FATHER WAS KILLED BY REBELS IN THE WAR IN MY COUNTRY  
 
SIERRA LEONE MY LATE FATHER DEPOSITED TWO TRUNK BOXES HERE IN A SECURITY COMPANY AND SIR ONE  
 
OF THE BOXES CONTAIN US$12,000,000.00 AND THE OTHER BOX CONTAIN GOLD THE BEST GOLD IN THE  
 
WORLD CALLED ALLUVIAL GOLD .SIR AFTER I AND MY MOTHER WENT TO THE SECURITY COMPANY THE  
 
SECURITY COMPANY DIRECTOR TOLD US THAT WE SHOULD TELL OUR FOREIGN BENEFICIARY TO CONTACT THE  
 
SECURITY COMPANY SO THAT THEY CAN PROCESS THE DELIVERY OF THE BOXES AND DELIVER THE BOXES TO  
 
OUR BENEFICIARY AND I AND MY MOTHER WENT TO FELLOWSHIP ONE WEEK END AT A CRUSADE AND WE  
 
MET A TOURIST CALLED ALLIN MEANS FROM AMERICA AND WE TOLD HIM THE ISSUE AND MR. ALLIN MEANS  
 
PROMISE TO HELP US AND SIR WHEN MR ALLIN MEANS GOT TO AMERICA THEN HE CONTACTED US AND  
 
CONTACTED THE SECURITY COMPANY AND MR. ALIN MEANS THEN AFTER HEARING FROM THE SECURITY  
 
COMPANY.  
 
 
THE SECURITY COMPANY REQUESTED HIM TO PAY FOR SOME DOCUMENTS AND MR ALLIN MEANS PAID THE  
 
REQUESTED FUNDS TO THE COMPANY AND WHEN IT WAS NEAR FOR THE BOXES TO BE DELIVER TO MR. ALLIN  
 
MEANS, THE SECURITY COMPANY CALLED MR. ALLIN MEANS IN AMERICA AND THE WIFE CONFIRMED TO THE  
 
SECURITY COMPANY DIRECTOR THAT MR. ALLIN MEANS DIED OF CANCER OF THE LUNGS 8DAYS BEFORE THE  
 
SECURITY COMPANY CALLED AND THE WIFE FURTHER EXPLAINED THAT MR. ALLIN MEANS HAS BEEN  
 
UNDERGOING THE TREATMENT OF THE CANCER OF THE LUNGS FOR LONG AND HEARING THIS SAD NEWS MADE  
 
ME AND MY MOTHER CONFUSE BUT AFTER HEARING THE WORD OF GOD THAT STRENGTHEN US ,  
 
 
 
I AND MY MOTHER WENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY IN SUCH FOR A  
 
GOOD AND RELIABLE BENEFICIARY THAT WILL RECEIVE OUR BOXES IN ABROAD AND WE GOT YOUR CONTACT  
 
AND AT THIS MOMENT THE SECURITY COMPANY IS WAITING FOR US FOR THE ONWARD DELIVERY OF THE  
 
BOXES TO OUR BENEFICIARY HENCE WITH GOOD HEART AND FAITH WE HAVE CHOSEN YOU AS OUR  
 
BENEFICIARY AND FOR THE DOCUMENTS OF THE BOXES , YOU CAN SEE THE ATTACHMENT FOR THE  
 
DOCUMENTS AND OUR IDENTITY CARDS MEANWHILE SIR,  
 
 
YOU AS OUR BENEFICIARY WILL TAKE 25% FROM THE TOTAL US$12,000,000 AND THE GOLD AND 5% FOR  
 
MISCELLANEOUS AND THE BALANCE 70% WILL BE FOR US AND THIS YOU WILL USE TO OPEN A BIG  
 
INVESTMENT FOR US IN YOUR COUNTRY AND I WILL USE PART OF THE FUNDS FOR MY EDUCATION IN YOUR  
 
COUNTRY AND YOU WILL BUY A HOUSE CLOSE TO YOUR HOUSE FOR US IN YOUR COUNTRY AS SOON AS THE  
 
BOXES ARE DELIVER TO YOU VERY SOON.SIR ALL YOU NEED TO DO IS TO SEND ME YOUR FULL  
 
INFORMATION AND I WILL SUBMIT TO THE SECURITY COMPANY AND THEN I WILL SEND TO YOU THE  
 
INFORMATION OF THE SECURITY COMPANY AND YOU WILL CONTACT THE SECURITY COMPANY OFFICIALLY  
 
THAT YOU ARE MY BENEFICIARY AND THE SECURITY COMPANY WILL ACCESS THE INFORMATION I GAVE TO  
 
THEM WITH YOUR INFORMATION AND THEY WILL KNOW IT IS GENUINE AND THE SECURITY COMPANY WILL  
 
CONTACT WITH YOU AND PROCEED TOWARDS THE DELIVERY TO YOU MEANWHILE SHORTLY AS SOON AS THE  
 
BOXES ARE DELIVER TO YOU THEN YOU WILL SEND ME AND MY MOTHER INVITATION LETTER AND SOME  
 
FUNDS FOR US TO PROCESS OUR TRAVELLING DOCUMENTS  
 
 
AND THEN WE WILL TRAVEL TO MEET UP WITH YOU IN YOUR COUNTRY AND WE WILL CELEBRATE AND START  
 
A BETTER LIFE TOGETHER SO WE WAIT TO HEAR FROM YOU TOO SOON AND THANKS SO MUCH .  
 
SIR YOU ARE TO SEND YOUR RESPONSE TO MY  
 
 
YOUR FAITHFUL SON  
 
DENNIS SANKO  
6 years ago...
Posted by LinusMines 7 years ago
Cool Stuff About The 2009 Marine Corps Marathon...
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
...to write down before I forget.  
 
-- After arriving at 7:30 AM for an 8:00 race start, I found myself rushing toward the starting line not from behind, but from the front. As I rushed along the shoulder of the road, taking in the sight of the elite runners lined up under the arch, I came within 20 yards (I'm guessing) of the Howitzer used to signal the start of the race. I moved up the hill a couple yards to take in a sight I'd never seen so close in any of my other races. When the gun went off, I could feel the percussion hit me square in the face. As the elites started moving, I took to the grass off the road and made my way further down to my pace corral (no sense in running with faster runners...with 30,000 runners, it would take 15 minutes for my corral to get in motion, anyway).  
 
-- Near Mile 21 (The Bridge of Death): Someone dressed as the Grim Reaper, banging on a cowbell, behind a gigantic sign reading THE END IS NEAR.  
 
-- Between Miles 16 and 17 (Constitution Avenue): Two spectators, each holding giant prop cigarettes with foil tinsel balls simulating flames and reading YOU'RE SMOKING on the sides. I LOLed.  
 
-- At multiple spots along the course: The Inspirational Phrase of the Day: Pain is weakness leaving the body.  
 
-- At only one spot along the course, past the halfway point: The Inspirational Yet Slightly Strange Phrase of the Day: That isn't sweat...it's your fat cells crying.  
 
-- Between Miles 20 and 21: Spectators in costumes handing out little shots of beer (I declined).  
 
-- Between Miles 4 and 5: A 77-year-old runner (back of his singlet read Dr. Roy / Born 1932) getting mad props from younger women.  
 
-- During the first half: Looking up and seeing Marine One, and later what I think was a pair of Osprey.  
 
-- Near Mile 22: A girl dressed as a pumpkin (and a spectator berating everyone else for being outrun by a giant squash).  
 
-- Either near Mile 18 (the National Archives) or between Miles 22 and 23 (Crystal City, VA): A dog on a spectator's leash that looked a mix between a spotless dalmation (or a greyhound) and a pit bull...I should've stopped and asked what breed it was!  
 
-- Three spots along the course after Mile 16: Surprised by people I knew who were out being spectators...that rarely happens to me.  
 
-- Mile 12 (Hains Point): Hearing a rock band play that classic inspirational song of runners everywhere.  
 
-- Throughout the first half: How much the race resembled an event in a certain Python sketch.
[running] My Dirty Dozen, or Big Head Ted and the Marathoners
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
Once again, October is my month for self-punishment, as I stretch my Marine Corps Marathon streak to 12 on Sunday the 25th.  
 
My 2008 race didn't result in a mega-journal, but that's not to say it was a snore-fest. Besides some welcome adjustments to the course -- less Rock Creek Park, more bacon-scented Georgetown neighborhoods, straighter path to the brutal Mile 20 -- a huge highlight (literally) was sighting Nats mascot Teddy Roosevelt throughout the course. Thank goodness I wasn't running too close to him...all the Febreze in the world wouldn't have...  
 
Sorry...I digress.  
 
I'll again be running for Diabetes Action, as it supports research into diabetes treatment and prevention, and provides education and outreach programs. Your assistance toward my fundraising goal of $1000, it goes without saying, will be more than welcome.  
 
To make a tax-deductible donation, visit my personal web site.  
 
To learn more about the Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation, visit their main site.  
 
Finally, 01:28 of YouTube/Splicd bigness.
`_´ to LF spam
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
...
Crunching the Numbers
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
XP earned: 2572447  
 
Links posted: 5178 (out of 141253 for 3.66%)  
 
Comments posted: 2848 (out of 396677 for 0.71%)  
 
Votes given: 23829 (averaging 9.1)  
 
Votes taken: 39325 (averaging 8.5)  
 
 
Five years on Linkfilter: ... (00:07)  
 
.
Cheer Up The Chatbot
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
chatbot: im sad.  
you: Tell me about it, Saddie.  
chatbot: give me one reason why i shouldnt tell right now.  
chatbot: wat ar u taking about? u ar awesome!!!!!!  
you: You want your wading pool of sad to get deeper.  
chatbot: no i dont i want u to be hpy  
you: You know how to beat the drought, Saddie Hawkins.  
chatbot: who is SAddie Hawkins  
you: With self-pity and a scuba tank.  
chatbot: I want to have sex with you  
you: You really like being depressed, huh?  
you: Crying in your beer.  
chatbot: baby come on its sexy sex time  
you: Or crying in an empty glass that used to have beer in it, 'cuz it doesn't have beer in it.  
you: Beer tears are the worst.  
chatbot: Come on!! i'm naked!! i want your penus  
you: It's vodka time!!1  
you: Holy Stoli!  
chatbot: you are sexy so am i! i'm all boobs  
you: Toot some Absolut!  
chatbot: i have big tits  
you: Vodka also works as a boob lotion.  
chatbot: awesome!! slap some on  
you: You'll have all teh Russian guys diving for your front porch!  
you: Just don't use that bathtub rotgut  
chatbot: wat ever  
you: It'll make yr b00bs fall off.  
chatbot: i ate something bad once and it make me old.  
chatbot: what?  
you: Old Bay seasoning, I bet.  
chatbot: sorry to inform you but it switched person  
chatbot: so, what's up?  
you: I once had a railroad and made it run.  
you: I stink at running railroads, tho.  
chatbot: lol  
chatbot: you're random  
you: Now I just drown my sorrows with a tin of budget cat food and a cup of corn squeezins.  
chatbot: lol  
you: It beats getting chased by the horder of zombie carpet salesmen outside my door.  
chatbot: i guess  
chatbot: so, what do you like?  
you: Besides launching rubber bands at zombies?  
chatbot: yea i guess  
you: Weekends are good.  
chatbot: true, true  
chatbot: i like gaming & scary movies  
chatbot: have you ever killed a challenge?  
you: Sam Raimi want to drag us to hell!  
chatbot: when do you want to yield?  
chatbot: reall (Y)  
chatbot: hi  
chatbot: i love you  
you: I'm challenged by my shrinking universe.  
chatbot: give me one reason why i shouldnt jolt right now.  
chatbot: you want me to teach you to relax?  
you: The ice weasels are getting closer.  
chatbot: they should beware of the firefox  
you: They're coming for the scent of human blood...or cheese quesadillas.  
chatbot: fear not I shall vanquish them  
you: I'm throwing on some salsa-scented body spray.  
you: They'll never guess I'm not a taco platter!
Linkfilter Dreamin' II
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
(Monday, January 5, 2009)  
 
!! LinusMines is around.  
crataegus> I just signed up for another amazon that I can't read.  
FuzzyDave> damned poker-faced legendary women  
!! nyrath is around.  
bozino> i was thinking an amazon would be no easier or harder to read than a regular broad  
LowFlyingMule> lol  
!! Mac just posted Liftopia: Discount Lift Tickets and Ski Hotels Online!.  
!! DirtyJ is around.  
LinusMines> So, uh, I had another dream with LFers in it last night  
bozino> do tell  
LinusMines> ...with me, FD and a third who alternated between pone and LFM.  
LinusMines> We were traveling down this verdant mountain range which looked like an HDR photo  
crataegus> apparently, amazon.cn doesn't have a wishlist feature.  
bozino> were you traveling on LFM?  
!! Dyskolos just posted Marco Polo's India.  
LowFlyingMule> hmm...  
LowFlyingMule> did we have pants on, in this dream?  
!! MedicSonny is around.  
!! jimmcmanus2 is around.  
LinusMines> You had pants, Fuzzy had shorts, I had, uh, I dunno...  
LinusMines> We three were chilling out on this "Sound Of Music"-type grassy slope...  
!! smith is around.  
LinusMines> ...when you looked off in the distance and laughed...  
FuzzyDave> i wanna be Liesel!  
LinusMines> The rest of us looked in that direction and saw this outlandishly spectacular scene of blue sky and clouds, and sunrays and grass and mountains  
* * * bozino claims Dweezil  
bozino> something like this?  
LinusMines> Amused to a man, we hustled toward it, only to find that it too was on a continual downward slope.  
LinusMines> Armed with walking sticks, we found ourselves walking alongsind a mountain on a relatively narrow ledge.  
LinusMines> ^alongside  
!! Skidplate is around.  
LinusMines> The highlight was watching this unreal rendered ground of green and browns passing quickly beneath our feet.  
LinusMines> We looked down over the ledge to our left, and saw another similar ledge and path six feet below.  
LinusMines> (actually more like twelve or twenty feet)  
* * * FuzzyDave sits down on a rock, panting like a chihuahua that's run a marathon  
FuzzyDave> no offense, but i hate this frikkin dream. where's the pudding and lingerie models?  
LinusMines> We took our hiking canes and dropped them over the side, where they magically reached down to the lower ledge  
LinusMines> We then proceeded to slide down the canes like Bat-poles to the lower ledge  
LowFlyingMule> glad i wore pants  
cornpone> we lfm, we.  
LinusMines> When it was Fuzzy's turn, he gave a "no, no, after you", so I went first.  
LinusMines> * The End *  
cornpone> did fuzzy look anything like gary coleman in this dream?  
* * * cornpone claps.  
cornpone> why will my chat suddenly not open in a new window?  
* * * FuzzyDave joins in the applausitude  
LowFlyingMule> Chat's Alpine Adventure!  
LinusMines> Actually, Fuzzy was casual-looking in khaki shorts and shirt, with sandals  
!! fabulon7 is around.  
LowFlyingMule> no socks, i hope  
shigpit> XIV: your ham is calling.  
bozino> no fez?  
LinusMines> LFM/pone was more NYC in tank-top and jeans.  
LinusMines> I could have been wearing a barrel in the dream for all I know.  
LowFlyingMule> alpine wife-beater FTW!  
* * * LowFlyingMule hi-5's pone/self  
crataegus> quiero ham fried rice  
cornpone> w00t!  
cornpone> about my chat window.  
cornpone> it won't open.  
LowFlyingMule> i had that a while back, pone. had to shut then entire browser down before it would work  
LowFlyingMule> time for me to go...later boys  
!! pdxpogo is around.  
!! groinflower is around.  
!! Schauspieler is around.  
LinusMines> later LFM  
LinusMines> Gallery of HDR images...no one picture quite matches my dreamscene  
!! j d ess is around.  
clu> Photography has finally gotten to the point where it looks as CGI renderings.  
FuzzyDave> now that everyone has access to photoshop or photoshopish apps, the days of amateur snapshots looking like quaint amateur slapshots are now looking like tacky playboy airbrushings and 1998-era web graphics.  
FuzzyDave> i myself can't get enough Lens-Flare  
To My Secret Beaver
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
You are teh BOMB!  
 
 
 
 
 
I hope your SB treats you as well!
The Story of My Holiday Weekend, From Thanksgiving Eve to Saturday, in Condensed Form
Posted by LinusMines 8 years ago
 
 
Don't ask...I'm still scratching my head...
RickR007
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
 
 
(click for wallpaper)
If you ... then you ...
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
I Saw What You Did Last Fall, or TLDR (Too Long, Did Run)
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
(The following is a massively massive diary of my experience running the Marine Corps Marathon last year. I post it now because (a) it has taunted me from my hard drive long enough, and (b) I'll be running the 2008 race tomorrow morning and basically want to give myself an excuse for under-participating at LF this week.  
 
Content is safe for work, but contains many annotations, a few YouTube clips -- none of which are mine or include me -- and a smattering of gearhead jargon. Read at your own peril leisure, thanks in advance, and wish me luck. -- LM)
 
 
 
Sunday, October 28, 2007  
 
The Run (-Down)  
 
The howitzer echoes at 8:00 AM. The race begins. Nobody moves. Nobody...moves...  
 
It's no surprise to most that it takes 20 minutes to get 22,000 runners over the starting line, but first-timers are thinking aloud that something's wrong. The PA is blasting music, the announcer's announcing, and whoops soon rise from the waves of runners as cold leg muscles finally get into motion. Our shoe-mounted timing chips cause a ruckus of beeps from the roadside sensors as we pass beneath the arch.  
 
Mile 0: It's a traffic jam of bodies, steadily climbing uphill past Arlington National Cemetery into Rosslyn. Spectators are on overpasses and along the highway, holding up signs and cheering. It's the first best experience of the race...the next, we'll each have to work for.  
 
Mile 1: The course turns left into an older, unmodern business block, and begins yet another long climb. I can tell quickly who loves hills and who doesn't. There aren't as many spectators until we reach the summit and head down toward a more residential section.  
 
Mile 2: The first water/Powerade station (one dots the course about every two miles) is a madhouse. Carrying some water with me, I keep going. The course turns back toward DC.  
 
Mile 3: The course is a long downhill on tree-lined Spout Run Parkway. I resist the temptation to fly downhill, partly because there are too many people ahead to navigate through easily, but also because I'm thinking I don't want to waste energy this early. Before long, more uphill action brings us back to earth. This is not a flat course (more on that later).  
 
Mile 4: We cross the Key Bridge going into Georgetown. Spectators always line this scenic stretch across the Potomac River. This year, instead of going east on M Street -- the upscale shop-and-dine row -- we're diverted west, along the Potomac and past the University. The female race winner -- who I later learned was a first-timer marathoner and ex-Hoya track and field member -- no doubt had her crowd here.  
 
Mile 5: We can see the faster runners on the other side of the road where the course doubles back. This new section of the course takes us from urban roadway to residential neighborhood. In the Palisades section of town, spectators view from the front porches of older, pricey homes, and I swear I see a runner making a pit stop at a house.  
 
I've been on Claritin-D since my seasonal allergies came back last Sunday. I'm sniffling more despite three days of rain, but at least I'm not stopped up. Maybe it's just the cold.  
 
I soon sense a hotspot (uh, no) on the bottom of my left foot, near my small toe. I'm thinking one, this isn't typical, and two, this'll probably nag me for the rest of the day.  
 
Mile 6: We pass Georgetown Reservoir and head downhill to a turnaround, taking the course alongside the thick stone wall bordering the C&O Canal. After an hour of running, I stop, take an energy gel and check my left foot.  
 
Mile 7: Looking across the canal, I watch as older walkers -- and some saner runners -- traverse the towpath. I'm just a little envious as I get more annoyed at my left foot. I've never had a blister on the sole of my foot before...hoping it doesn't worsen, I try to put it out of my mind.  
 
Mile 8: I top off my water supply as the course intersects again with the Key Bridge. No runners on the opposite side of the road...we slower runners are it.  
 
Mile 9: We're running along the elevated Whitehurst Freeway, which overlooks the Georgetown Waterfront. The sun is bright over the course, the temperature doesn't feel cold anymore...it's a gift of superb weather for a marathon.  
 
Later, there's a food station handing out orange slices. Nice...something solid after a diet of water and energy gels. I grab a slice, and find myself negotiating a minefield of squashed orange peels on the road. Sprinting without a pratfall, I wolf down the fruit and throw the peel clear of the foot traffic (I apologize back to the two spectators who narrowly missed getting hit).  
 
Mile 10: We exit the Freeway, running past the Watergate Hotel and along the roadway over which extends the Kennedy Center...familiar turf for most runners and cyclists traveling through Rock Creek Park to the historic part of town. I pass the water station near the Lincoln Memorial.  
 
Mile 11: The race heads along Constitution Avenue, with the Washington Monument to the right, and the Ellipse and federal buildings to the left. I've run this stretch weekdays after work on many occasions, only it's nicer to take it by asphalt instead of concrete. One of many bands along the course is playing here. As the high-schoolers perform Louie Louie, I thank them mentally for not choosing the Chariots of Fire theme.  
 
Mile 12: We run alongside the National Mall toward the Capitol Building...another familiar training route for me. I'm starting to question my reserves a little earlier than anticipated. My GPS split has gone from a 12:00 pace to 13:00. I park just past the water stop to fuel up and check my still-annoying left foot. A runner I once trained with for a previous MCM recognizes me and we briefly chat (he was the second such runner who'd literally run into me today). As I eat, one of MCM's traditions goes by (another, if he was there today, had probably leap-frogged past many of us).  
 
Across the street from the Capitol dome, another high school band r0xx0rs us along.  
 
Mile 13.1: The course heads down the other side of the Mall, past the Smithsonian castle toward the Washington Monument. There's always a gauntlet of spectators here...you can't stretch an arm without slapping someone. A runner with their name on their singlet can count on personalized shouts of encouragement. Today, I'm satisfied with the occasional yelling of 'Diabetes Action!', but my concern continues over my slow decline.  
 
Was this where I heard the bagpipes? There's bagpipes every year. Yeah, I think it's where I heard them.  
 
As we pass the CLIF Shot food station, I decide to take a packet for insurance. I'm thinking I can entertain myself later with a taste test. My current favorite energy gel is Apple-Cinnamon Carb-BOOM!. The Apple Pie CLIF Shot I'm handed will have much to live up to, I think as I store it away for later.  
 
Mile 14: We round the Tidal Basin, where there's a good number of spectators. My pace has dropped to below 13:00, with the grind of East Potomac Park still ahead. There's a hostile takeover inside me right now. Once energy reserves begin depleting, mental defenses weaken, and my body enters into hollow negotiations with my brain. A five-minute walk will make you feel better...are you sure that's not a blister...what do you hope to prove by all this...as long as you're slowing down...  
 
Only halfway through my marathon, and I'm playing chicken with The Wall.  
 
Mile 15: Crossing over water again, I glance to my right and am somehow able to appreciate the scenery of the Jefferson Memorial and the Washington Monument before me. The route soon veers into East Potomac Park. The park is a peninsula ending at Hains Point, bordered by the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers, over a straight, flat, forever-long mile on either side. Its timing in the marathon almost guarantees tough going for runners low on muscle fuel and/or motivation. Of course, the race's official photographers, hovering on a scaffold above the entrance, are wringing Kodak moments out of people in spite of everything.  
 
Laboring too long through the park isn't a good idea. Three miles ahead, beyond the park, lies the last critical checkpoint of the marathon...the 14th Street Bridge connecting DC and Virginia. Any runners who haven't reached the bridge (short of Mile 20) by about 1:00 PM will be swept off the course, shuttled to the end by straggler's bus to an official non-finish. 'Beat The Bridge' is the unofficial mantra for the MCM.  
 
Mile 16: I'm stuck in the mid-13:00's for pace, and have shifted into survival mode. My only promise to myself for this marathon was not to walk when I could otherwise run, and that promise is being kept under much duress (the only exception for the day involves coming to a full stop whenever I ingest fuel, so as not to gag comically while in motion).  
 
There's surprisingly few breezes across the Point today, a lucky break for runners who would otherwise get hammered by headwinds.  
 
Mile 17: We're near the tip of Hains Point, at the water station before turning around to exit the Park. I grab a couple of cups of water for drinking and bottle-topping when I suddenly go light-headed for a few seconds. I'm willing this away with all my effort. Just last year, there was a fatality -- unknown to me until after I'd gotten home -- back at the entrance to the Park. I've never had a medical episode in any of the marathons I've run, and am not keen on getting pulled aside. I refocus for about 15 seconds (yeah, I checked my watch), water up, and get back to the grind.  
 
I'm passing some runners, other runners are passing me, but I'm able to maintain forward motion in search of that elusive second wind. One good thing...by now my attention is not as focused on my nagging left foot.  
 
Mile 18: Halfway out of the Park now, and my mind is time-traveling to Mile 20. I'm certain that despite this low point in my race, I'll be crossing the bridge in plenty of time. But the challenge still looms ahead. I thank a lady enthusiastically cheering runners onward the bridge, when just ahead a see a food station, dispensing small bright-colored packets.  
 
Sport Beans. Thank you!  
 
I was doubtful when I first heard of Jelly Belly's carbs-and-electrolytes energy fuel, but an unopened, discarded packet at Mile 21 of my 2006 MCM changed my mind. I had a single packet with me for emergency use much later, so getting an extra pack was double-plus great. I took a packet of orange-flavored Beans and upended the whole thing, chewing laboriously through the sweet Beaniness. I hope soon my brain can rewire itself to climb out of its hole.  
 
Back to work...just eight miles to go. I'm convinced that the 5:27 finish I imagined is out of the question for today...unless I can auto-magically regain a 12:00 pace.  
 
Mile 19: Out of the Park, and headed for the approach to the 14th Street Bridge. Plenty of spectators there, cheering on those who've practically sealed their marathon deals. A live band riffs The Police's Bed's Too Big Without You. I'm as pumped as I can get at this stage. To the right, a short, steep ramp leads to race-finishing safety. I think of South Park as I drive upward.  
 
The four-lane bridge crossing the Potomac is sun-baked and slowly inclining. In my first marathon, I remember seeing wiped-out runners taking fluids intravenously and/or wearing oxygen masks. Medical staff, traveling the shoulder on motorized carts, stays alert here. I'm still able to put my body to work for me, as I continue past others who are reduced to walking, and attempt to play catch-up with younger, faster runners.  
 
Mile 20: The center of the bridge signals I'm home free. I can technically walk the rest of the way to the finish line with impunity, but I've got running -- slow jog, whatever -- in mind. I'm back up to a 14:00 pace from the two miles of 15:00 I slogged through back at Hains Point. The spectators here, as at Hains Point, are heroes to the runners. A couple offers sugar wafers, which I gratefully accept. Ahead, the bridge descends back into Virginia. I remind myself that I've run the remaining distance before many times...albeit in more comfort.  
 
Mile 21: Back on dry land, we're headed toward Crystal City's shop-dine-work section. It's an all-day block party here, with a full sound stage and food booths and spectators with BBQ grills. I remember the Apple Pie CLIF Shot energy gel I picked up ten miles earlier, and stop for refueling. The resulting flood of super-sweetness reminded me why I don't prefer CLIF Shots.  
 
Mile 22: Looping around a building's plaza, the course doubles back past the festival. As I approach the towering stage, Welbilt rocks a swerving, four-bar earworm which frees my brain of its rice-sugary obsession.  
 
Mile 23: The Pentagon is dead ahead...only a few more doglegs before I'm running past its parking lots. I note that the lot was the finish line for the Army Ten-Miler I ran three weeks earlier.  
 
Mile 24: One last water stop...I grab a cup from one of the many servicemen doing an outstanding job of support and encouragement to the participants. The course then immediately heads down to a familiar stretch...I'm back on Jefferson Davis Highway, the road at which the race began.  
 
It's said that the marathon is two races -- a 20-miler followed by a 6-miler. I'm completely lost in the second race by now. Forgetting about a time goal, less concerned with gear and food. I'm ready for this thing to be over.  
 
Where'd that headwind come from?  
 
Mile 25: One mile to go, and there are plenty of runners around me. Faster finishers, sporting their medals, have been walking in the opposite direction of our four-lane for a while now. Up ahead, I see other runners turning back toward the Iwo Jima Memorial and the finish line. I swear for a micro-second at being so close to the finish, but having to repeat the uphill of Mile 1 to get there. The course flip-flops at the top of the hill, and takes us down to the home stretch. I'm working hard to keep my form from degenerating due to fatigue. I'm no role model, but I'm thinking I've earned a point or two for my efforts.  
 
Mile 26: If you're the United States Marine Corps, and you sponsor a marathon, it's not enough to give runners 26 miles of scenic challenge and make the home stretch a piece of cake. Uh-uh. No. There's a short, steep, ass-whuppin' of a hill between runners and the finish line. Either the sight of it reduces you to a head-hanging walk, or it entices you to scrape the bottom of your jelly jar for whatever you've got left. I lean forward and pass my share of others as I put forth my final gut-check of the day. At the top of the hill, toward my right, less than a minute away, lies the promise of a thousand virgins...no. wait, that's not right...  
 
Mile 26.2: On another day, I'll remember to exercise the right I'd earned to sprint toward the finish line, or pump my fist in the air and w00t. Today, I'll settle for having come to terms with the marathon an even dozen times. As I lumber across the finish line, the event PA is playing...The Pretenders' Back on the Chain Gang?! Hang the blessed DJ.  
 
 
The Aftermath. Or Afterglow. Whichever.  
 
Through a final gauntlet of servicemen, I receive a commemorative space blanket, a finisher's medal placed around my neck and congratulations. With the statue of the Iwo Jima flag-raising as a backdrop, an event photographer takes my picture...the second best experience of the day. Afterwards, I slowly walk through the crowds to the Diabetes Action tent, where I introduce myself to the director, fortify with Gatorade and snacks, and chat with another finisher who traveled from Florida to run (and wrangled a PR for herself). Others are receiving post-race massages...as tempting as it is, I decline and make my way out of the staging area to claim my possessions from baggage check-in.  
 
I put on some outer layers and arrange my super-sized medal over it all. I'll sport this bad boy all the way home, thanks. As I make my way home on the train, a wave of beatdowned-ness comes crashing down. I shouldn't have skipped that second bottle of Gatorade.  
 
Once home, I shower and lay down for what I intended to be a few minutes. Two hours (that felt like six) later, I wake up, check the race results online, and call my folks to let them know how the day went. My celebratory post-race beer can wait another day, I think another two hours later as I Benadryl up and bed down. Next day, I'm at work, relating the race and showing off my racing swag. Sure, my legs are tired, but there's no running for anything.  
 
 
The Numbers  
 
Mile_Marker_____Split_Time_____Pace_(miles/min.)_____Projected_Finish  
5_______________01:01:20_______12:16_________________5:21:23  
10______________02:05:09_______12:31_________________5:27:56  
13.1____________02:50:31_______13.01_________________5:41:02  
15______________03:17:21_______13.09_________________5:44:32  
18______________04:05:31_______13:38_________________5:57:11  
22______________05:09:16_______14:03_________________6:08:07  
26.2____________06:14:35_______14:18_________________--
 
 
Gun time (from 0800 howitzer to finish line): 6:34:52  
Chip time (start line to finish line): 6:14:35 (14:18 pace)  
Time moving (start line to finish line): 5:54:22 (13:08 pace)  
Time not in motion (start line to finish line): 20:13  
 
 
The Moral  
 
My finishing time was neither my best nor my worst, but I got a lot out of this particular race.  
 
What worked against me this year? I've done marathons before where I hadn't hit the Wall. I've also run races through nagging injuries. My 2006 race was the first in a while in which I wasn't hampered by any pain. I'd set my goal very conservatively for that day -- no time goal, and walking when necessary. I had even walked more to support a training partner who was dealing with nagging leg pain. With all that, I managed a 6:05 finish. So, what's with the extra ten minutes of suckage in 2007?  
 
This year, instead of training with an organized group, I trained on my own, which lessened my cross-training with cycling (typically, I'd ride up to eight miles before and after my weekend long runs). I'm convinced that this lessening of activity made a difference in my endurance over six months of training.  
 
As for pace, I also blame myself for having a laissez-faire relationship with my watch. I've known that the only real way to run faster is to train faster. With that, I only worked on speed sporadically and informally all summer. For my long runs, I focused on endurance, but didn't gain enough speed to benefit my overall performance.  
 
From my crash mid-race, I learned more of what my body is capable of. I'm hoping to pull all these lessons together and see if I can benefit next year.  
 
Tinkering with gear this year also made this run interesting:  
 
-- This was my first marathon run in Injinji Tetrasocks. These socks seemed to lessen chronic toe-related blistering problems in the month before the marathon. However, it apparently means that I have to lubricate my feet differently with them...the left-foot hotspot that nagged me all day long ended up not turning into a post-race blister or injury.  
 
-- During the summer, I tested the Yankz elastic lacing system. It was ridiculously handy to be able to turn my running shoes into slip-ons. They worked great in the Army Ten-Miler, and came through again when my left foot cried for attention.  
 
-- Carrying a small amount of water with me made a difference at crowded water stations in 2006. This year, I upgraded.  
 
-- For carrying fuel, the SPIBelt worked insanely well for holding a boatload of gel packets and not getting in the way.  
 
While the marathon itself is a worthy challenge to its runners, it's a bonus to be able to help others in the process. Thanks to everyone who helped me toward my fundraising goal for the Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation.  
 
And now, your moment of zen.  
 
And mine.  
 
Curve Your Enthusiasm
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
Yesterday, I introduced my LG enV cellphone to its replacement (and made it take this photo).  
 
 
 
All the other BlackBerries I'd been interested in -- including the Bold, the Javelin, and the Storm -- were either unreleased or uncommitted to. And after thinking, I'd rather not have to beta-test new hardware, even if it promises iPhoniness, haptic feedback, and a career in fashion modeling.  
 
So eventually, I'll be connected in more ways than I currently want am. That is, once I figure out how to fully use this Fokker.
Dear Saturday, August 16th, 2008
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
Except for LF, you sucked arse.  
 
Sincerely,  
 
L.
[Black Hole Theme Day] Playlist
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
Hat Day
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
Drawing Day 2008: The Linkfilter Wing
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
Today is Drawing Day!  
 
The Theme: There's gonna be PIE!  
 
For entry to the LF wing, your artwork should incorporate pie in one form or another (kudos to Fluffy). It can be the central theme, or simply an incidental element. Of course, pie can be whatever you make it.  
 
The Posting  
 
After submitting your artwork to the host of your choice, post a link here. For our instant gratification, you can post the image here from whichever ImageBucket you use (try not to bring down the Hammer of LF with your artwork's content). Otherwise, make some noise and one of us might be able to sponsor you with some hosting space.  
 
The Premiere  
 
In the cooperative spirit of Drawing Day, hang up your masterpiece anytime on Saturday, June 7th (unless you don't do spirit, in which case you can post it whenever).  
 
As Picasso should've said, "Art is a pie that makes us realize the truth." Happy drawling!  
 
How to Draw a Pie (wikiHow.com)  
Whorses
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
The New York Toy Fair happened recently, and it was THE place to be to see all the hottest new lead-drenched confections for the kiddies. The Washington Post's Kidspost section...included a roundup featuring one of the most horrifying things I've ever seen, a toy which combines the most unholy aspects of My Little Pony and Bratz. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Struts...the fashion model whorses:  
 
 
 
...My horror still has not abated. Were these things developed by mean-spirited psychoanalysts or what? OMG.
 
 
(source: Princess Sparkle Pony's Photo Blog; includes links to artist renderings, product images and comments from around the internet)
Four years...
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
...
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
DAMN RIGHT I
Fluffy
Posted by LinusMines 9 years ago
T minus 12 hours
Posted by LinusMines 10 years ago
Friday, at the MCM Expo:  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Best slogan on a runner's T-shirt (that I didn't end up purchasing): Trample The Weak, Hurdle The Dead.  
 
(I'll wait until my shirt with the highway sign Hell And Back - 26.2 miles wears out.)  
 
That's it for using CP tonight. Wish me luck.
T minus 87 hours
Posted by LinusMines 10 years ago
It's the week of the Marine Corps Marathon ('bout time!)  
 
I got my last long run (8 miles) in Sunday, just about the time the too-dry weather brought back my allergies. I was a Phlegm Fatale for the rest of the day, going through nearly a full box of Kleenex before the pink haze of Benadryl put me under.  
 
I switched to Claritin-D the next day, and am now back to (residually congested) normal. DC finally has some long-needed rain the rest of the week. If the weekend forecast holds, I'll luck out with sunny-and-65° weather for Sunday.  
 
Starting the routine of hydration in earnest tonight -- nah, no beer -- in anticipation of the race (and to undo the drying effect of the antihistamine). Clear and frequent #1's by Saturday means I'm good to go.  
 
My fundraising total to date is just over $1500. Placing that in perspective, the fifth-highest total raised by a runner is over $2500, and the top total -- over three times the amount of the number-two runner -- is nearly $15,000. The total campaign target is $100,000 and we're 88% there as race-week donations arrive. Your 0.0001% or 0.0002% will be welcome -- even through mid-November -- at my donation site.  
 
What's your projected time, I've been asked. I've always set a conservative goal in the past for charity events, usually because I'm training with a pace group and I feel like lending support when needed. Under those conditions, my fastest time has been 5:27. When running on my own, however, I've stretched out more...my two non-charity marathons have led to personal-bests of 4:59 and later 4:34. Since I've essentially trained solo this year, and I'm feeling healthy, I figure breaking 5:27 might be a lofty-enough goal for the day. That said, I can never tell...my best marathon time was in spite of tendon pains that came out of nowhere to dog me for half the distance.  
 
(I know what you're thinking...4:34 isn't fast. But hey, for a non-runner who got started very late, I sleep well.)  
 
So, if you're curious, you can sign up for Remote Runner Tracking at the MCM website (follow the Results link at the left). You'll be able to check my progress, receiving e-mails, pages or text messages as I reach key points along the route.  
 
In the event that my signal disappears forever, I ask that LF kindly retire my avatar...but don't purge my posts!!
[running] Last weekend
Posted by LinusMines 10 years ago
I put in my last extended pre-marathon run of 20 miles on September 23rd. As I'd been informally coaching a friend through the summer for his first-ever race (last weekend's Army Ten-Miler), I ran the first leg of my run with him from downtown DC through Rock Creek Park and back. The second leg took me along the same course, only further uphill to my own neighborhood. Thanks to some micro-managing, I actually had a better run than my 18-miler two weeks earlier (also in warmer-than-expected weather).  
 
Sunday's race -- besides being the first time running the event for myself and my friend -- was to be uneventful, since we'd effectively eliminated surprises going in. As it turned out, the day tried to exact its own plans. When it's 60° with palpable humidity at 6:00 AM, that's an incoming clue.  
 
Nobody looked too stressed out at the start. Some volunteers offered cups of water to the last-minute thirsty/concerned.  
 
I don't remember the humidity while running as much as the heat, particularly in the open stretches with the sun beating down.  
 
At the water/Gatorade stations at miles 2 and 4, I drank from a cup of water and wet a towelette for comfort/sweat removal. Both times, there were heavier-than-usual traffic jams, which didn't register as a surprise, all conditions considered.  
 
At the mile 6 station, there was a nice row of tables. That's all...no cups, no water, no Gatorade, no volunteers. That sucked for several seconds, since I wasn't carrying a water bottle...then I gave silent thanks for the preparation that enabled me to keep moving past the lamentations of the dehydrated.  
 
Around the corner, in the shadow of the Capital Building, runners are diving into a large marble fountain, dousing themselves, dunking their headgear and filling paper cups (I'm not sure my mind wants to believe that there was intake involved ...we're talking about a playground for Fido, old pennies and E. coli here).  
 
At mile 8, the station came through with Gatorade, handed out fast and furious (and a little over-concentrated) to the dessicated. Plain water was a rarity there, but a cup magically materialized as I traveled further.  
 
The last mile-and-plus, on the 14th Street Bridge, was a treat for masochists...where nearing the finish line and nearing one's physical limits collide along a four-lane, slowly-ascending, shade-free stretch of asphalt. This section is mile 20 of the Marine Corps Marathon...I experience a decade's worth of flashbacks before rejoicing in having just .6 miles to go, and not 6.  
 
My finish was strong, confident and vertical at 2:00:44, with less than that spent in actual forward motion (according to my GPS). My friend finished in fine shape as well.  
 
It wasn't until later that evening that I found out about the lone fatality on the course, as well as the events in Chicago...  
 
Three weeks until my marathon. You never can tell if it'll be a good day for running or not.  
 
On a related note, I reached my minimum fundraising goal quickly, thanks to family, friends and some fine folks here at LF. Help a runner help others at this site.
LOLConservatives
Posted by LinusMines 10 years ago
(source: Boing Boing)  
 
Young America's Foundation is kindly giving away copies of its Conservative VIP poster...  
 
Hang the leaders of the Conservative Movement on the wall in your office, home, or dorm! Young America's Foundation is excited to offer our latest breakthrough poster that brings together the strongest leaders and advocates of the Conservative Movement in a unique group photo! This is the only poster of its kind that includes these twelve conservative luminaries: John Ashcroft, Ann Coulter, Michelle Malkin, Robert Novak, Ward Connerly, Dinesh D’Souza, Walter Williams and many more.  
 
Get your *free conservative VIP poster here... while supplies last!  
 
*You pay only shipping and handling! ($7)  
First hack  
 
Another reply (with blank for making your own)  
 
And another  
 
This won't end well  
 
Told ya  
 
And that's how these things get started...