CoinTent is a subscription that lets you remove ads across the entire web while still supporting sites you love. CoinTent removes ads on every site you go to, and distributes the money from your subscription to the sites you visit based on the time you spend with them.


Finally! I've been saying this is how ad blockers should work for years.
Otter Source
Posted by potatono in the wired 246 days ago
The source code to Otter, the software that runs linkfilter.
Although Duo is available on both iOS and Android, Google's goal is clearly to give Android users a FaceTime-like experience...Google had three priorities when it crafted what it sees as the perfect app for one-to-one videoconferencing: simplicity, speed and "human" features.

The simplicity is apparent as soon as you launch the app. Similar to Snapchat, you're greeted with a view from your phone's camera, although on Duo it's your selfie cam...there's a row of yellow circles that show your most recent calls. In the bottom left is the big, blue call button; tapping it brings up a list of your phone's contacts.

...Duo uses your phone's contact list — not your Gmail contacts. And when you first set up the app, you do so with your phone number and not your Google account...
2/26: The Oral History
Posted by LinusMines in the wired 1 year ago
From two llamas escaping an Arizona retirement community to fashion’s most notorious optical illusion, February 26, 2015 was the day that everyone — everyone — came together online to cheer, then argue. One year later, the people who accidentally created a phenomenon remember the internet’s perfect storm and what it wrought.

[history]
A tiny but illuminating controversy over collards.

This is a story about how tiny things come to divide us. Fittingly, it begins with a Tweet. Last week, Whole Foods Market sent [it] to its 4.81 million Twitter followers...

Normally, I wouldn’t dwell on what I learned about a Twitter controversy. But this one so perfectly captures one perversity of digital media that it’s worth exploring in full.


By Conor Friedersdorf.

[blogs & zines, just add bacon]
Born 1983.
Dead never.
Cherry MX keyboards forever!
It’s a familiar story. A male entrepreneur (some might even call him a “tech bro”) – flush with the sense of self-worth and self-satisfaction that comes from living and working in a city and industry that treats him and his friends as the most important and intelligent human beings ever to grace a metropolitan area with their presence – takes a moment to think about homelessness. Not content to wrinkle his nose and move on with his day, he types those thoughts out. He publishes them on the internet.
That feeling when you hit a million followers, make more money than your mom, push a diet pill scheme, lose your blog, and turn 16.
"Tim Cook is right, and encryption and privacy experts are all on his side, but where are the other leaders of major U.S. companies? Where is Larry Page? Satya Nadella? Mark Zuckerberg? Jack Dorsey? I hear crickets chirping. Real leaders have courage, and on this very essential issue — in the face of fierce political pushback from law enforcement officials — only Tim Cook is showing any."
Break The Safe
Posted by glitch p-udding in the wired 1 year ago
An Apple Watch game in which you take advantage of the Digital Crown and haptic feedback to break into a safe.
"In dismissing the Apple Watch – or in rushing to market with poorly thought out, or obviously overpriced and cynically designed smartwatches – I think the Swiss watch industry is missing something, which is that Cupertino may understand luxury better than Europe right now. If [the Apple Watch's] bracelet had been designed in Switzerland it would probably have added four figures to the cost of the watch it came on, and I'm not sure that there is a watch brand in Switzerland with the imagination to design something like this right now. It's just one part of the most expensive Apple Watch outside of the gold Edition, and the whole watch costs $1,099. I can think of frighteningly few watches at any price, mechanical or quartz, that are as well designed."

In 2015, the Internet Archive started the year with the arrival of the DOS Collection, where thousands of games, applications and utilities for DOS became playable in the browser with a single click...

This year, it’s time to upgrade to Windows.

We’ve now added over 1,000 programs that run, in your browser, in a Windows 3.1 environment. This includes many games, lots of utilities and business software, and what would best be called “Apps” of the 1990s...

...Windows 3.1 still holds a special place in computer history, and we’re pleased to give you a bridge back to this lost trove of software. (blog)


[gadgets, the good ol' days]
Amazon’s releasing their very own game engine. Lumberyard, as they call it, is based on Crytek’s famous CryEngine, and can be used to develop games for both PC and consoles.
The Malware Museum
Posted by glitch p-udding in the wired 1 year ago
The Malware Museum is a collection of malware programs, usually viruses, that were distributed in the 1980s and 1990s on home computers. Once they infected a system, they would sometimes show animation or messages that you had been infected. Through the use of emulations, and additionally removing any destructive routines within the viruses, this collection allows you to experience virus infection of decades ago with safety.

Fancy a blast from the past? Curious about the Microsoft Windows release that introduced such familiar concepts as the Desktop, Start Menu, Taskbar and Notifications Area? Well, now thanks to the wonders of Emscripten and DOSBox, and modern JavaScript runtimes, you can try it out in your browser.

(more)


[gadgets, the good ol' days]