In 1961, the Cuban Missile Crisis was at hand, and with the overhanging fear of an impending Soviet missile strike...families in Central Florida built homemade bomb shelters.

...100 members of 25 wealthy families...pooled their resources and secretly built what is said to be the largest privately-owned bomb shelter in the nation, a massive subterranean structure that is now referred to as the Mount Dora Catacombs.
The members of [the 'Skullcap Crew'] ... have together faced at least 128 known official allegations from more than 60 citizen-filed complaints over almost a decade and a half. They have also been named in more than 20 federal lawsuits.

Citizens have repeatedly accused these men of acts of brutality, intimidation and harassment – costing the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal settlements. Yet over the course of their careers, these officers have received little discipline – a two-day suspension, a five-day suspension, a reprimand – according to city data. Instead, they have won praise from the department, accruing more than 180 commendations.

[government, vices]
What I wouldn’t give to go back 50 years and re-do the American road trip just like I picture it in my mid-century kodachrome dreams.
U.S. clocks spring forward again this Sunday, March 13, for daylight saving time, the annual event that stretches the hours of evening sunlight and irritates those who would rather leave well enough alone.
She was known as "the most perfect model," and in her heyday, one headline proclaimed, "All New York Bows to the Real Miss Manhattan." She earned the name not just because she was the toast of the town in the 1910s, but because her perfectly proportioned face and body inspired numerous works of sculpture that still stand in Manhattan, Brooklyn and The Bronx today.

One contemporary account concluded that Audrey Munson "posed for more public works than anyone" — at least a dozen of which are still on public display. New Yorkers may not know it, but they see Munson everywhere...


Daily Mail article (with artistic nudity)

[destinations]
Donald and Me
Posted by LinusMines in history 359 days ago
The [Village Voice] Revisits Wayne Barrett's 1979 Profile of an Ascendant Donald Trump

When Barrett began his series for the Voice, Trump was already something of a topic in the New York press, owing mostly to his developer father, Fred Trump. But he was also the architect of some high-profile deals in Manhattan in the mid-1970s. Even so, most of the attention that Trump the Younger had received by that point focused mostly on his outlandish personality and the sheer amount of money he’d been throwing around, which was remarkable in a city that was, by many accounts, on its last financial legs.

By contrast, Barrett’s series was the first to take a fine-tooth comb to Trump’s business practices. The reporter focused on two prominent development projects — the Hyatt Hotel in midtown and a proposed convention center on the West Side — and plumbed them in meticulous detail.

The two projects, now 40 years in the past, may seem like ancient history. But they were, in many ways, the deals that made Trump who he is today. He cited these same projects when he announced his candidacy back in June...

"I made it the old-fashioned way," Trump said of his fortune.

But Barrett’s reporting paints a picture of Trump’s background that’s somewhat at odds with the one he paints for himself...


Part 2: Behind The Seventies-Era Deals That Made Donald Trump

[some dude/some chick, filter the vote 2008]
It looks like the logo for an arena league team. Or a radio station. Or a bag of chips. Or a Saturday morning cartoon show. Or any number of other things that should never be confused with an NFL franchise.
Beehives and Big Mainframes
Posted by subtek in history 1 year ago
In the late sixties I worked for Bell Labs for a few years managing a data center and developing an ultra high speed information retrieval system. It was the days of beehive hair on the women and big mainframe computers. One day I took a camera to work and shot the pictures below. I had a great staff, mostly women except for the programmers who were all men. For some reason only one of them was around for the pictures that day.
Charles was the first black photographer at the New York Times. These photos, from 1966, were never published.
During the Cold War, many missile defense sites—precisely because their purpose was to guard infrastructure of vital national interest—were housed in urban or suburban locations. Los Angeles in particular, thanks to its aerospace facilities, military bases, and booming postwar population, became one of the most fortified regions in the United States.

"One advantage of being old is that you can see change happen in your lifetime. A lot of the change I’ve seen is fragmentation. US politics is much more polarized than it used to be. Culturally we have ever less common ground. The creative class flocks to a handful of happy cities, abandoning the rest. And increasing economic inequality means the spread between rich and poor is growing too. I’d like to propose a hypothesis: that all these trends are instances of the same phenomenon. And moreover, that the cause is not some force thats pulling us apart, but rather the erosion of forces that had been pushing us together."

Interesting read

A video showing the painstaking reconstruction of a dress from Iron Age Scandinavia using authentic tools and techniques.

The level of sophistication in the weaving process is amazing, and humbling. Fascinating stuff.

Bowery Boys Podcast
Posted by bear in history 1 year ago

New York City history is America’s history. It’s the hometown of the world, and most people knows its familiar landmarks, buildings and streets. Why not look a little closer and have fun while doing it?

The Bowery Boys, Greg Young and Tom Meyers, have lived in New York for the past 20 years and have been curious about the city since the day they arrived. Join them for a fun take on history, a “romp down the back alleys of New York City.”

Two guys talking about history, usually focused upon a place, person or event (e.g., Penn Station, the Boy Mayor of New York or the Great Fire of 1835). Some shows are just Greg expounding upon smaller subjects and are usually 20-25 minutes. And there are occasional guest hosts as wel

Seen from a distance, Hashima Island might be mistaken for the Japanese counterpart of Alcatraz rising from the ocean like a ragged slab of concrete, or perhaps a gambling resort with deserted hotels. Few casual observers would ever guess that, only 40 years ago, this tiny island was the site of a thriving community with the highest population density on earth.


Renegade BBS
Posted by potatono in history 1 year ago
The Wikipedia entry on Renegade BBS, an inspiration to me from the pre internet days. The linkfilter colors system is based on Renegade.. I can barely remember how it works now.