What Donald Trump wants to get accomplished or initiated in his first 100 days.
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...the Most Controversial Race at the Olympics

The women’s 800-meter competition will be one of the most eagerly anticipated events at the Rio Olympics, and not just because the racers are fast. Some are also biologically different, at least to some degree. In earlier Olympics, they might have been disqualified, or even accused of being men. That won't happen in Rio. But the whole world will be looking very closely at South Africa's Caster Semenya (on LF) and her closest competitors.
(quote) When many lower-income Americans are feeling isolated by the deadening uniformity of things, by the emptiness of many jobs, by the media, they still yearn for physical social networks. They are not doing this by going to government-run community service centers. They are not always doing this by utilizing the endless array of well-intentioned not-for-profit outreach programs. They are doing this on their own, organically across the country, in McDonald’s. (end quote)
"For the second year in a row, those surveyed cited the rise of the Islamic State as the greatest danger to the Middle East — half of the young people identified it as such — followed by the threat of terrorism. After that, Arab youths cited more prosaic and universal concerns that included unemployment, the rising cost of living and the lack of strong political leadership."
In addition to the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters, the US government is pursuing court orders to force Apple to help bypass the security passcodes of "about a dozen" other iPhones, the Wall Street Journal reports. The other cases don't involve terror charges, the Journal's sources say, but prosecutors involved have also sought to use the same 220-year-old law — the All Writs Act of 1789 — to access the phones in question.
In an unusual tribute, the ashes of well-known Italian coffee impresario Renato Bialetti were placed in a giant aluminum coffee pot at his funeral this week.

New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan tears into the paper:

"Imagine if The Times really had taken on the Flint outrage with energy and persistence many months ago. With its powerful pulpit and reach, The Times could have held public officials accountable and prevented human suffering. That’s what journalistic watchdogs are supposed to do. As traditional local investigative reporting withers, The Times’s role becomes ever more important.

Yes, that takes journalistic resources. Investigative reporting is notoriously time-consuming. But are such resources really unavailable?


After all, enough Times firepower somehow has been found to document Hillary Clinton’s every sneeze, Donald Trump’s latest bombast, and Marco Rubio’s shiny boots. There seem to be plenty of Times resources for such hit-seeking missives as “breadfacing,” or for the Magazine’s thorough exploration of buffalo plaid and “lumbersexuals.” And staff was available to produce this week’s dare-you-not-to-click video on the rising social movement known as “Free the Nipple.”"

"His final albums were a glance back and a new excursion. “The Next Day,” released in 2013, returned to something like the glam-rock sound of his 1970s guitar bands, for new songs suffused with bitter thoughts of mortality. And “Blackstar,” released two days before his death, had him backed by a volatile jazz-based quartet, in songs that contemplated fame, spirituality, lust, death and, as always, startling transformations."

Watch a fitting song and video, released just last week. Reminisce about the past some other time. Even in death, Bowie is living in the now.

The California High School Exit exam took millions to administer, sucked countless hours of class room instruction away from kids and is now, dead. The repercussions of this decision are huge, as now thousands of students will be granted a high school diploma who didn't have one before, but there are "silent" casualties to this decision as well.

This is important for any state that has or is considering a graduation test requirement.

An article detailing some of the problems with the exam here.

An Op-Ed that sums up my feelings here.

The Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement was an epic water-sharing pact between irrigators, ranchers, dam owners and tribal fishermen along the Klamath River. It was only made possible by wrenching negotiations between ranchers and the Yurok, Karuk and Klamath tribes. It appeared that, against all odds, the disparate parties in Oregon’s Klamath Basin had united to repair the damage done by an extended drought and outmoded dams.

But then Congress failed to implement it, and helped set the stage for the lunacy currently unfolding in Burns.


The collapse in the oil price is the result of oil - as a commodity - being "freely traded for the first time since 1928".

It's disrupting everything. Really.

After pulling out a pistol and demanding a working penis pump, a man fled from a St. Paul adult video store and sex shop Wednesday evening and remains "at large," police said.  
 
The man walked into Viva Video, at 918 University Ave., seeking to exchange a penis pump he had purchased, claiming it didn't work as advertised. The clerk argued that any problems were due to "operator error," a police report said.
Cool summer temperatures can be found in major cities across the United States. Among the country's 51 largest cities, San Francisco tops the list for usually having the coldest weather each day in June, July and August.  
 
The major cities included in the weather rankings below represent the 51 metropolitan areas in the United States with the most people, all those with over one million residents in 2010, according to the US Census Bureau.
Despite countless WikiLeaks copycats popping up since the secret-spilling site first dumped its cache of State Department cables last year, the new generation of leaking sites has produced few WikiLeaks-sized scoops. So instead of waiting for insider whistleblowers, the hacker movement Anonymous hopes that a few outside intruders might start the leaks flowing.  
 
Earlier this week members of the hacker collective, and specifically a sub-group known as the People’s Liberation Front, (PLF) launched two new leaking sites, LocalLeaks.tk (not to be confused with the similarly named Localeaks.com) and HackerLeaks.tk. Both hope to receive documents through an anonymous submissions channel, analyze them, and then distribute them to the press to get “maximum exposure and political impact.”  
 
But while LocalLeaks aims to use WikiLeaks’ model of insider sources to expose corruption on the local scale, HackerLeaks openly invites data thieves to upload documents through its submission system, so that they can be analyzed and publicized. “You download it, we’ll disclose it for you,” the site’s homepage reads, listing potential booty such as “databases, exploits, security flaws, documents, and email spools.”