A new levitation device uses ultrasonic speakers to create sound fields that can trap particles in midair. Unlike other devices that also use sound radiation to manipulate matter, the new system can move several objects in different directions at once . This kind of levitation technology, described online the week of December 17 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could assemble microelectronics or maneuver small objects inside the body for medical treatment.
The past year saw tremendous advancements in humanity’s capacity to explore space, and 2019 promises to be no different. From mysterious Kuiper Belt objects and Martian probes to historic rocket launches and daring efforts to touch the Sun, here’s what the next 12 months have in store.
The Mounds of Cydonia
Posted by amsterdamn in destinations 50 days ago
Based on high resolution images from the ESA Mars express and NASA orbiter HiRise cameras, this paper gives new in-depth analysis of the remarkable geometric distribution of certain "mounds" or hill-like features in the Cydonia region of Mars. It validates the earlier measurements obtained using the lower resolution NASA Viking images, which hinted strongly at artificial surface interventions and adds new information regarding the geometry.
Virgin Galactic's supersonic space plane soared into the upper reaches of Earth's atmosphere Thursday (December 13) for a milestone test flight. It indicates the company is not far off from sending tourists to space.
In an effort to better grasp the sun's past, present and future, Colombian and Spanish researchers made visualizations that meld the last 400 years of recorded solar observations. The sun is a churning celestial body with a lot going on. On top of singular episodes like flares, the sun experiences various cycles that last years, decades and longer. And these chapters in solar activity are full of lulls and highs that affect Earth in many ways.
Quantum entanglement in a macroscopic mechanical system has been demonstrated by physicists in Austria and the Netherlands, who confirmed that their experiment passes the “Bell test” for entanglement. The system was created by Simon Gro?blacher and colleges at Delft University of Technology and the University of Vienna and could lead to the development of new quantum-information technologies such as memory nodes.
Dr. Siddarth Joshi who recently moved to the University of Bristol and is continuing to develop quantum networks in the Quantum Engineering Technology Labs, said: "We created a very versatile quantum communication network where every user can talk to every other user simultaneously. We plan to build even bigger networks with many more users, with the goal to create a versatile foundation for building a quantum internet."
Earth is not the home you think it is. Far below the scant surface spaces we inhabit, the planet is teeming with an incredibly vast and deep 'dark biosphere' of subterranean lifeforms that scientists are only just beginning to comprehend. Hidden throughout this subsurface realm, some of the world's deepest and oldest organisms thrive in places where life shouldn't even exist, and in new research, scientists have quantified this 'dark matter' of the microbial world like never before.
As Americans’ attitudes towards psychedelics change, we’re seeing the start of something few would have ever dreamed possible: legalization. A slew of new research on the measurable benefits of psychedelic compounds, as well as increased media exposure and cultural acceptance has already made the 21st century stand in stark contrast to the extreme taboo and draconian state punishments levied against psychedelics in the 20th.
Does some aspect of our personality survive bodily death? Long a philosophical and theological question, in the 20th century this became the subject of scientific research. Fifty years ago, in 1967, Ian Stevenson, then chair of UVA's Department of Psychiatry, created a research unit—now named the Division of Perceptual Studies—to study what, if anything, of the human personality survives after death. In this Medical Center Hour, faculty from the Division of Perceptual Studies highlight the unit's work since its founding,
What was the state of humanity before civilization arose? To this day the popular conception, both among the public and as promulgated by many historians and archaeologists, is that of small, primarily nomadic, bands of people perpetually on the brink of existence, endlessly in pursuit of their next meal, characterized as “stone age”. This all changed with the domestication of plants and animals and the development of agriculture, which ultimately led to the first great civilizations taking root in such regions as Mesopotamia and Egypt around 5000 to 6000 years ago. This nice neat scenario may be the modern dogma, but that does not assure its veracity. There is another, much older, view found among the classical ancients – including the Greeks, the Romans, and the dynastic Egyptians – which is encapsulated in the legend of Atlantis.
In what can be described as a monumental step forward in the relentless pursuit of 9/11 truth, a United States Attorney has agreed to comply with federal law requiring submission to a Special Grand Jury of evidence that explosives were used to bring down the World Trade Centers.
Over the last 100 years, scientists have realized, first in rats, that neurons in mammalian brains were capable of producing photons, or "biophotons." The photons appear, though faintly, within the visible spectrum, running from near-infrared through violet, or between 200 and 1,300 nanometers. The question is why?
A Nasa scientist has theorised intelligent alien life may have already been on Earth and believes that current thinking about extraterrestrial life is far too narrow. He called for physicists to take part in "speculative physics", grounded in our most solid theories but "with some willingness to stretch possibilities as to the nature of space-time and energy" and to "consider the UFO phenomenon worthy of study".
Just before 9.30am on Sunday 11 November, a series of unusual seismic pulses rippled around the world almost undetected. The waves rang for over 20 minutes, emanating about 15 miles off the shores of Mayotte - a tiny island in the Indian Ocean between Madagascar and Africa. It was not only the power of the seismic waves which puzzled scientists when they began to examine the readings, but also the curiously regular shape of the waveform.