Google announced yesterday that they have decided to offer the Nik Collection desktop suite for free starting March 24 as a "long-term investment" move in "building incredible photo editing tools." The powerful photo editing suite went for a bundled product at $149 at Google but is now free for everyone 24/7. Some years back, the Nik Collection would have cost photography enthusiasts a whopping $500. Google is even offering a full refund to those who have purchased the software this year.

Photography buffs, professional or amateur, may now make use of the powerful photo editing collection with its wide range of features in seven desktop plug-ins for Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Lightroom, and Apple Aperture: Analog Efex Pro, Color Efex Pro, Silver Efex Pro, Viveza, HDR Efex Pro, Sharpener Pro, and Dfine. The suite includes black-and-white controls, vintage camera filters, noise reduction, HDR effects, color enhancement, color correction, and sharpening. Now anyone can have the capability to retouch, sharpen, and adjust the color as well as tonality of photos like a pro without spending a fortune on software.

Download the Google Nik Collection here.
Nothing can trigger a memory so unexpectedly as an aroma. Clove oil immediately transports you to the dentist’s office. Crayola crayons take you back to elementary school. But some fragrances are being phased out of existence thanks to technology and safety regulations. How many of these do you miss?
Human happiness has direct corelation with how social we are. But a new study suggests that if you have fewer friends, it might be a sign that you are smart! That means smarter people are better of with fewer friends in life.
So if you a loner and like to spend more time all by yourself and enjoy it, this may be a sign of gratification and intelligence according to this study. You smaller circle of friends or hangout only with a handful shows that you fall under the smarter ones.
There is something undeniably creepy about the legend of vampires drinking blood through a single bite to the neck, but just how long would they have to spend clamped on an artery to get a decent meal? As Gizmodo reports, this question is exactly what a team of physics students at the University of Leicester sought to answer in a recently published study.
Since the 1960s, most US states have elected their own official fossils, often after fierce campaigns by students (as in Tennessee, Missouri, Pennsylvania), teachers (Vermont), and politicians (California). Even states where evolution is a touchy subject in classrooms have chosen animals and plants that lived thousands or millions of years ago for their avatars.
This blog records the investigatory work of Garson O’Toole who diligently seeks the truth about quotations. Who really said what? This question often cannot be answered with complete finality, but approximate solutions can be iteratively improved over time.
U.S. clocks spring forward again this Sunday, March 13, for daylight saving time, the annual event that stretches the hours of evening sunlight and irritates those who would rather leave well enough alone.
By pushing the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to its limits astronomers have shattered the cosmic distance record by measuring the distance to the most remote galaxy ever seen in the Universe. This galaxy existed just 400 million years after the Big Bang and provides new insights into the first generation of galaxies. This is the first time that the distance of an object so far away has been measured from its spectrum, which makes the measurement extremely reliable.
GeoGuessr places the player on a series of five algorithmically determined semi-random locations around the world. The locations are limited to roads and other paths that have been photographed by Google Street View cameras, which excludes the majority of Asia and Africa, large portions of South America and most of the far north in Canada and Russia.

The Street View window of GeoGuessr does not provide any information beyond the street view images; things such as road signs, vegetation, businesses, climate, and landmarks have been suggested as some clues that may help the player determine their location. The player may also move about along the roads through the normal directional controls provided by Street View. Once the player is ready to guess the location, they will place a location marker on a zoom-able Google Map. After the placed marker is submitted as a guess, GeoGuessr reveals the true geographic location and assigns the player a score depending on how far away the player's guess was from the true location.
Some phenomena that appear to be well understood are much more mysterious than it seems. In spite of the numerous applications that rely on the presence or absence of bubbles, no advanced scientific studies had been carried out so far into how bubbles form (video). A team of researchers tackled this question and developed a self-sustaining bubble machine in the laboratory. The researchers have managed to determine the minimum speed at which air must be blown on a soap film to form bubbles, under various experimental conditions.
A 3,000-year-old ancient wheel from the Bronze Age, was recently uncovered at an archaeological site known as "Britains Pompeii". Archeologists working at Must Farm in Peterborough, Britain recently announced the discovery of the wheel, which is the biggest complete example of a wheel to be found in the UK. The discovery will give researchers better insight into the transportation and technologies used by people during the Bronze Age.
One hundred thousand years ago, research suggests, a group of Homo sapiens — isolated from their own kind — came across a group of Neanderthals. The rest, as they say, is history — and the proof of their love affair has just been uncovered in ancient DNA.
Sarah Parcak is a space archaeologist. She uses satellite imagery to track looted ancient burial sites and find pyramids hidden under Egyptian cities. Now, she has bigger plans: to launch a worldwide campaign to make all of us space archaeologists.
A Rutgers scientist has identified a flower trapped in ancient amber as belonging to a species completely new to science.
Lena Struwe, professor of botany in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, has discovered that two flowers found encased amber for at least 15 million years belong to none of the known 200 species of the genus Strychnos. Therefore, they represent a newly discovered species, Strychnos electri. Struwe coined the species name in honor of its amber origin, since elektron is the Greek word for amber.
 
"By sequencing the nuclear genome of an ancient finger bone, researchers have confirmed the discovery of a new type of human that lived in the Altai Mountains in southern Siberia more than 30,000 years ago. This long-lost group of people, which researchers are calling "Denisovans" after the Denisova cave in which the bone was found, lived at roughly the same time modern humans and Neandertals were in the region, and it appears to be more closely related to Neandertals than us. Although these Denisovans went extinct, they were widespread enough in Asia to interbreed with modern humans before they disappeared, leaving behind a ghostly legacy in the genomes of Melanesians."