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Cool summer temperatures can be found in major cities across the United States. Among the country's 51 largest cities, San Francisco tops the list for usually having the coldest weather each day in June, July and August.  
 
The major cities included in the weather rankings below represent the 51 metropolitan areas in the United States with the most people, all those with over one million residents in 2010, according to the US Census Bureau.
Despite countless WikiLeaks copycats popping up since the secret-spilling site first dumped its cache of State Department cables last year, the new generation of leaking sites has produced few WikiLeaks-sized scoops. So instead of waiting for insider whistleblowers, the hacker movement Anonymous hopes that a few outside intruders might start the leaks flowing.  
 
Earlier this week members of the hacker collective, and specifically a sub-group known as the People’s Liberation Front, (PLF) launched two new leaking sites, LocalLeaks.tk (not to be confused with the similarly named Localeaks.com) and HackerLeaks.tk. Both hope to receive documents through an anonymous submissions channel, analyze them, and then distribute them to the press to get “maximum exposure and political impact.”  
 
But while LocalLeaks aims to use WikiLeaks’ model of insider sources to expose corruption on the local scale, HackerLeaks openly invites data thieves to upload documents through its submission system, so that they can be analyzed and publicized. “You download it, we’ll disclose it for you,” the site’s homepage reads, listing potential booty such as “databases, exploits, security flaws, documents, and email spools.”
So the Sony saga continues. As if the whole thing about 77 million breached PlayStation Network accounts wasn’t bad enough, numerous other security breaches in other Sony services have followed in the ensuing weeks, most recently with SonyPictures.com.  
 
As bad guys often like to do, the culprits quickly stood up and put their handiwork on show. This time around it was a group going by the name of LulzSec. Here’s the interesting bit:
IEA in Paris announced yesterday a release of 60 million barrels from OECD inventories. The implications of this extraordinary action are not positive. Let’s first take a look at the most recent global production data, which shows the large downward move of supply coming into March 2011, from the loss of Libyan oil. IEA is pointing to this loss of supply as the prima causa for its decision.  
 
While some asset markets, perhaps global stock markets, may take comfort from the lower price of oil over the next 90 days, the intermediate term realities, implied by this action, are rather worrisome. I will list a few here:
I have never been more desperate to explain and more hopeful for your understanding of any single fact than this: The protests in Greece concern all of you directly.  
What is going on in Athens at the moment is resistance against an invasion; an invasion as brutal as that against Poland in 1939. The invading army wears suits instead of uniforms and holds laptops instead of guns, but make no mistake – the attack on our sovereignty is as violent and thorough. Private wealth interests are dictating policy to a sovereign nation, which is expressly and directly against its national interest. Ignore it at your peril. Say to yourselves, if you wish, that perhaps it will stop there. That perhaps the bailiffs will not go after the Portugal and Ireland next. And then Spain and the UK. But it is already beginning to happen. This is why you cannot afford to ignore these events.  
 
The powers that be have suggested that there is plenty to sell. Josef Schlarmann, a senior member of Angela Merkel’s party, recently made the helpful suggestion that we should sell some of our islands to private buyers in order to pay the interest on these loans, which have been forced on us to stabilise financial institutions and a failed currency experiment. (Of course, it is not a coincidence that recent studies have shown immense reserves of natural gas under the Aegean sea).  
China has waded in, because it holds vast currency reserves and more than a third are in Euros. Sites of historical interest like the Acropolis could be made private. If we do not as we are told, the explicit threat is that foreign and more responsible politicians will do it by force. Let’s make the Parthenon and the ancient Agora a Disney park, where badly paid locals dress like Plato or Socrates and play out the fantasies of the rich.
It's not just high gas prices. America has a growth problem and a jobs problem that might be beyond Washington's control.
Scientific experts believe Japan's nuclear disaster to be far worse than governments are revealing to the public.
A hacker group was brazenly ramping up its antics as waves of cyberattacks targeting even the US spy agency expose how poorly defended many networks are against Internet marauders.  
 
"It's becoming a big problem, because at the end of the day these guys are doing whatever they want," said Panda computer security labs technical director Luis Corrons. "This is showing us that we have a long way to go to protect our systems and our information."  
 
The public website of the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) on Wednesday joined a growing list of hacker targets that has included Sony, The International Monetary Fund, and Citibank.
Dogs have been going after beavers at University Lake so long that the beavers have drawn a line in the sand, says state Fish and Game biologist Jessy Coltrane. Come in the water near their lodge, get bitten.  
 
"They were harassed for years. And they finally said, 'that's it'".
For nearly a week, the world followed the saga of Amina Arraf, the blogger who was celebrated for her passionate, often intimate writings about the Syrian government’s crackdown on Arab Spring protesters. Those writings stopped abruptly last Monday, and in a posting on her blog, “A Gay Girl in Damascus,” a cousin said Amina had been hauled away by government security agents.  
 
News of her disappearance became an Internet and media sensation. The U.S. State Department started an investigation. But almost immediately skeptics began asking: Had anyone ever actually met Amina? On Wednesday, pictures of her on the blog were revealed to have been taken from a London woman’s Facebook page.  
 
And Sunday, the truth spilled out: The gay girl in Damascus confessed to being a 40-year-old American man from Georgia...
 
 
[cc: the wired]
Re-inventing Opec
Wednesday’s Opec meeting may have resulted in a no-change decision on production targets, but as more and more people are noticing, its importance lay elsewhere — in signalling some significant turmoil within the organisation itself.  
 
Indeed, if ever proof was needed that Opec may be turning into an outdated institution for today’s commodity markets, Wednesday’s meeting could very possibly have been it.  
 
Saudi oil minister Ali Naimi, was famously quoted calling it “one of the worst meetings we have ever had.”  
 
Needless to say, the analyst community is having a blast trying to interpret the significance of it all.
A leftist former army officer with questioned human rights credentials narrowly won Peru's presidency in a bitterly fought runoff with the daughter of disgraced ex-President Alberto Fujimori.  
Ollanta Humala, 48, won Sunday after softening his radical image and disavowing the affinity for Venezuela's socialist President Hugo Chavez that fueled his defeat in a first run for the presidency five years earlier.  
He promises Peru's poor a greater share of the Andean nation's considerable mineral wealth and pledged in victory to honor the free market but put Peruvians first.  
The former army lieutenant colonel won 51.5 percent of the vote against 48.5 percent for Keiko Fujimori, according to complete unofficial results compiled by the independent election watchdog Transparencia.
The hacker collective Anonymous Operations may not be the most organized but they sure are passionate. Following the latest disinformation campaign of a Greek bailout, the hackers, which had previously expressed their solidarity with the Greek people (see below) have no made it clear that the latest target of their wrath (which a few months ago was the Federal Reserve) is now the IMF. Or at least its website. As of a few minutes ago, "Anonymous" tweeted that the target of its imminent DDOS attack will be www.imf.org. Alas, since the IMF has always been merely a figurehead for global bailout efforts, in this particular case spearheaded by various banking interests, we give Anonymous a few days before they realize that the target of their "anti oppression" move has a website with a .com suffix, not .org. And regardless of how (in)effective this action is, at least it sends the message that someone is willing to do something to at least protests against the rape that will soon occur in Greece, hidden by the very polite word: "privatization."
A Chicago lawyer says his opponent in a small-claims case is using an unfair tactic by having a buxom woman sit next to him at counsel’s table.  
 
Attorney Thomas Gooch said the woman’s sole purpose “is to draw the attention of the jury away from the relevant proceedings” — a dispute over a used car.
Under new guidelines, Japanese children are allowed to be exposed to 20 times more radiation than was previously permissible.  
 
The new regulation means children can now be exposed to as much radiation as a German nuclear worker.  
 
The government argues the change is essential to keeping schools open in the Fukushima region.  
 
According to Nobel Prize-winning group Physicians for Social Responsibility, the new limits mean exposed children now have a one-in-200 risk of getting cancer, compared with a one-in-500 risk for adults.  
 
Japan nuclear radiation leak gives birth to earless bunny (Video)